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04/18/2014 06:03 AM
Ester Rada: Israel’s rising music star
ester-rada

Ester Rada is one of Israel’s rising musical stars and has recently released her first album, Life Happens. Photo: polevoy.info

Ester Rada is one of Israel’s rising musical stars and has recently released her first album, Life Happens.

She says growing up as the daughter of Ethiopian immigrants was sometimes confusing as “a black Jew in a land of white people”.

She spoke to the BBC about her musical journey – and how she has gone back to her Ethiopian roots for inspiration.

And you can hear more about Ester’s life and the experiences of other people of African descent on the BBC World Service in Africans in the Holy Land on Saturday 19 and Sunday 20 April. The programme will be available to listen online here.

BBC VIDEO: Ester Rada Israel’s rising music star




04/16/2014 02:11 PM
“Yegna Band” under fire for receiving £4m UK aid
Yegna Band

Yegna are a five-strong group that aim to empower women

by Larisa Brown

The popular UK media “Mail Online” attracted massive UK citizens followed by up roars for its recent reporting of £3.8m UK Department for International Development aid to “Yegna Band”

How you pay £4m to fund the Ethiopian Spice Girls: New aid storm over project that’s even ridiculed in African country

· Yegna are a five-strong group that aim to empower women
· Is part of a £30million scheme called Girl Hub that also operates in Nigeria
· Have their own radio show but it only reaches half the population
· Group given £3.8m by the UK Department for International Development

UK taxpayers have picked up a £4million bill to fund Ethiopia’s own Spice Girls.

Yegna, a five-strong group, have launched a radio show and released a string of videos that aim to empower women in the African country.

But even Ethiopian critics of the project say the money is being wasted because the show reaches only a quarter of the population.

Like the original Spice Girls, the band members each have a nickname. Teref Kassahun, 26, plays the spoiled brat, Lemlem Hailemicheal, 26, a tomboy known as the defender, Zebiba Girma, 22, the mysterious character, Eyerusalem Kelemework, 27, is the genius and Rahel Getu, 22, the dependable one.

Lyrics to one of their songs, This House, included: ‘Women are sisters, women are mothers, women are wives. Let’s respect them. Tell that guy to respect girls and we will respect him.’

Yegna is behind a twice-weekly radio drama and talk show for adolescent girls. They have been given £3.8million by the Department for International Development and £800,000 by the Nike Foundation.

A DfID spokesman said girls in Ethiopia faced challenges such as forced marriage, violence, teen pregnancy and dropping out of school.

‘Yegna addresses these issues using role models to champion the potential of Ethiopian girls in ways which are accessible and relevant,’ said the spokesman. But the Yegna radio broadcasts on Sheger FM in Addis Ababa and on other radio stations in the Amhara region, reach only 20million of the country’s 80million people.

Last year the Girl Hub project was condemned by the Independent Commission for Aid Impact. Its report warned of serious deficiencies in governance and told of an unacceptable lack of child protection policies. Girl Hub has also been accused of ‘poor budgeting and financial monitoring’.

Matthew Sinclair of the TaxPayers’ Alliance said: ‘Taxpayers are fed up of their hard-earned cash being spent on projects that don’t deliver meaningful aid to recipients.

‘It’s time to reassess DfID spending and focus money on things like disaster relief, so that taxpayers and recipients get a good deal.’

Tory MP Philip Davies described Girl Hub as ‘a complete waste of money’. ‘It can only reinforce the view that DfID have got far too much money,’ he said. ‘They have got so much that they are struggling to find ways to spend it and you end up with projects like this.’

A source told the Mail that Yegna had proved lucrative for the five young women: ‘They came from poor backgrounds, three of them worked for a theatre company. Now they are rich in comparison.’ Overseers of the three-year project allegedly spent £16,000 of the funding on having a famous singing star in one of the girls’ music videos. DfID has denied this claim.

The managing director of an Ethiopian media company working to empower women said he could run his project for 154 years at the same cost as the Yegna initiative. Moges Tafesse, from Synergy Habesha, said: ‘To me, the project does seem very expensive.’

Mr Tafesse said his show, Finote Heawan, will be broadcast on FM97 – a government-owned radio station the entire country can listen to.

A media commentator, who did not want to be named, said: ‘Putting on the radio show is nonsense.

This kind of empowering women has to be aimed at the people in the countryside – it is those girls who are abandoned.

Those girls who are in the city with access to the show have got their education and know about their rights.’

Lemlem told the Mail: ‘It is definitely worth the cost – it is an amazing issue. It means a lot to Ethiopia and we are using the money effectively. It is a big change.

‘We are like the Spice Girls except our music is not just for entertaining – it is educational.’



04/13/2014 01:53 PM
Award Night: 2nd Annual Colours of the Nile Film Festival in Ethiopia
award night in Addis Ababa

At the 2014 Colours of the Nile Film Festival award night in Addis Ababa. (Photograph courtesy of CNIFF)

The winners at last month’s second annual Colours of the Nile International Film Festival (CNIFF) in Ethiopia — which highlighted 48 films from across the African continent — included Rumours of War by Soussaba Cisse from Mali (Best Feature, Best Cinematography and Original Soundtrack), President Dia by Ousmane William Mbaye from Senegal (Best Documentary), Adamt by Zelalem Woldemariam from Ethiopia (Best Short Film), Mugambi Nitenga in Nairobi Half Life from Kenya (Best Actor), Bertukan Befkadu in Nishan from Ethiopia (Best Actress), All is Well by Pocas Pascoal from Angola (Best Sound), and Virgin Margarida by Licinio Azevedo from Mozambique (Best Screenplay).

The event (From 24 – 31 March) was organized by the Blue Nile Film and Television Academy in partnership with the Ethiopian Filmmakers Association, was held at various locations in Addis Ababa such as the Alliance Ethio-Française, Italian Cultural Institute and the Ethiopian National Museum, while opening and award nights took place at the Ethiopian National Theater.

VIDEO: 2nd Annual Colours of the Nile Film Festival in Ethiopia

source: tadias.com




04/10/2014 05:07 AM
Award Night: 2nd Annual Colours of the Nile Film Festival in Ethiopia
award night in Addis Ababa

At the 2014 Colours of the Nile Film Festival award night in Addis Ababa. (Photograph courtesy of CNIFF)

The winners at last month’s second annual Colours of the Nile International Film Festival (CNIFF) in Ethiopia — which highlighted 48 films from across the African continent — included Rumours of War by Soussaba Cisse from Mali (Best Feature, Best Cinematography and Original Soundtrack), President Dia by Ousmane William Mbaye from Senegal (Best Documentary), Adamt by Zelalem Woldemariam from Ethiopia (Best Short Film), Mugambi Nitenga in Nairobi Half Life from Kenya (Best Actor), Bertukan Befkadu in Nishan from Ethiopia (Best Actress), All is Well by Pocas Pascoal from Angola (Best Sound), and Virgin Margarida by Licinio Azevedo from Mozambique (Best Screenplay).

The event (From 24 – 31 March) was organized by the Blue Nile Film and Television Academy in partnership with the Ethiopian Filmmakers Association, was held at various locations in Addis Ababa such as the Alliance Ethio-Française, Italian Cultural Institute and the Ethiopian National Museum, while opening and award nights took place at the Ethiopian National Theater.

source: tadias.com



04/09/2014 07:19 AM
Linda Murithi brings Editorial Edition to Hub of Africa Fashion Week
linda-murithi

Linda Murithi, co-founder and creative director of Hub of Africa Fashion Week (HAFW)

Known as one of Africa’s most glamourous gatherings, Hub of Africa Fashion Week is planning to set the international fashion industry a buzz in October 2014, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – the diplomatic capital of the continent.

With the recent website re-launch of Hub of Africa Fashion Week, the team behind the premier event is certainly introducing a relatively new concept for fashion weeks in Africa – an Editorial Edition.

Aside from a curated selection of African fashion designers, the 2014 Hub of Africa Fashion Week Editorial Edition will see international Editors from various trend-setting media mediums and Buyers placed in the forefront.

Why Editorial? Capital Lifestyle Magazine sat down with Linda Murithi, Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hub of Africa Fashion Week, and MD of In The Bag to understand more.

Click HERE to read the interview



04/07/2014 08:13 AM
Tomas Doncker: A Soulful Music Man

Tomas Doncker: A Soulful Music Man

Tomás Doncker has been part of the national and international music scene for some time, traveling to places like China, Japan, and Ethiopia just to name a few, promoting his Global Soul message. All of this has not been a solo ride for him, for he has had a tribe of talent—past and present—by his side.  Along the way, Doncker was fortunate in making the right connections and cycling back to those connections.  If you ask him where home is: he most likely will say anywhere from Brooklyn to Ethiopia and everywhere in-between. I’m a citizen of the planet.  In the past, he was part of the NYC bohemian scene, working shoulder-to-shoulder with James Chance (and others) and cementing the No Wave movement’s goals.  Currently, he is the founder of the True Groove label which focuses on his genre inclusive movement, Global Soul. Recently, he linked up with The Orchard, which should be instrumental in propelling his efforts on a larger stage.

You can read the entire interview with Tomas Doncker HERE.




04/02/2014 05:40 AM
2014 Gumma Film Award

The Gumma film award was held at the National Theatre on February17th in which 23 Ethiopian movies made in the year 2012 were nominated for 17 different categories.

Accordingly the Gumma film award for Best Film of the year 2012 went for Yelomi Shita. Solomon Bogale took home the Best Actor award while Elizabeth Melaku took home the award for Best Actress of the year.

One of the leading categories in the Gumma film award is an award for a Lifetime Achievement, which this year went to the 88 year old director Michel Papatakis, who created Ethiopia’s first 35mm color film called Gumma some 40 years ago during the reign of Emperor Hailesellasie I.

According to the organizers, Gumma film award envisions to cultivate and bring up the Ethiopian film industry to the world’s standard. It has also a vision of creating a platform for Ethiopian films to promote Ethiopian culture, values and Ethiopian stories worldwide.

The Gumma film award was created by director Yonas Berhane Mewa, the founder and owner of Ethio Films Production. Eighty seven judges have participated in this year’s film award selection process.



04/01/2014 04:06 AM
Addis sidewalks: where life happens
Addis sidewalks

Sidewalks in Addis Ababa are the setting for many interesting stories. Walking down the street, there are the shoe shine boys waiting for business, car washers, the vendors carrying candy, gum, tissue paper and cigarettes, people chewing Khat or having coffee. Sidewalks in Addis Ababa are multi-purpose; from shops to cafes sometimes it seems people forget they are for walking.

The stories of the sidewalks are now captured through the work of Tessema Getahun. His exhibition opened at Asni Gallery on Thursday March 20th.

Tessema’s Photographs capture the everyday occurrence of the life that filled the sidewalks of Addis Ababa. His pictures show the amazing chaos how sidewalks can be.
The artist who taught himself photography has been documenting Addis Ababa’s sidewalks and other Ethiopian stories for over a decade creating an impressive archive of over fifty thousand images.

Tessema born in 1950, studied Business Administration and acquired his B.Sc. degree from California State University Fresno (CSUF) in 1974. He worked for the Agricultural Industrial Development Bank (AIDB) and Ethiopian Beverage Corporation until he started running his own private business in 1981.

The exhibition at Asni Gallery will stay open until April 5th. As the photographs show what we normally see everyday walking around, it definitely inspires those who visit the exhibition to get their phones out and take pictures as well.

Tessema has proved that you don’t have to professionally learn to take photographs, so go ahead and visit the show and be inspired to experiment with your camera as well. Who knows, it might be your exhibition people will rave about next time!

source: capitalethiopia



03/20/2014 01:47 AM
Ethiopia’s clothes firms aim to fashion global sales
Yefikir Design's clothes are handmade from cotton

Yefikir Design’s clothes are handmade from cotton

Ethiopian fashion designer Fikirte Addis kneels down and wraps a tape measure around the waist of a customer, before scribbling on a piece of paper on which the outline of a flowing gown takes shape.

The customer, Rihana Aman, owns a cafe in the capital, Addis Ababa, and went to Ms Fikirte’s shop in the city, Yefikir Design, for a wedding dress fitting.

The dress, however, is actually for her sister, who lives and works in London, but will soon return to her homeland with her English fiance.

Ms Rihana explains how she shares her sister’s figure, and that the cotton dress will be ready for when her sister arrives back for her “melse”, the Ethiopian wedding ceremony.

“I love the traditional aspect of the clothing,” Ms Rihana says of why she chose Yefikir. “So many dresses now are too modern, and use fabrics that lose what it means to be Ethiopian.”

Along with other designers, Ms Fikirte is drawing on Ethiopia’s rich cultural heritage while adding a modern twist to find success in the fashion industry at home – and increasingly abroad.

As a result, fashion design is proving to be one of the most successful Ethiopian sectors for small business and entrepreneurs, generating profit margins ranging from 50% to more than 100%.

Rich heritage

Companies such as Yefikir have flourished in Ethiopia due to the absence of big chain department stores, and relatively low start-up costs, set against the high prices individuals are willing to pay for quality, traditionally made fashion garments.

All Yefikir designs are made by hand on weaving machines operated using techniques that go back centuries.

Yefikir ethiopian Designs

Yefikir’s designs are not quick to make

Flashes of colour come from strips of tilet and tilf – intricately woven or hand-embroidered multi-coloured patterns – which skirt hems, go around waists or course down backs.

It took Musie Teamrat, a 27-year-old embroider, 10 days to make three tilfs for one Yefikir dress.

As a result of such painstaking work, Yefikir’s custom-made dresses can sell for up to 15,300 birr ($850; £530), a sizeable sum, especially in a country where many toil for no more than 50 birr a day.

Despite such apparent inequities, many Ethiopians – especially those in its growing middle class – are happy to pay handsomely for tailored garments with traditional influences, says 25-year-old fashion designer Mahlet Afework.

Read more from BBC




03/13/2014 10:06 AM
SatLink Communications chosen for global distribution of Ethiopian news channel

etv-ethiopian television

The Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency (ERTA) has chosen SatLink Communications, a leading provider of satellite services, for the global distribution of its ETV news channel.

As a result of the partnership, ERTA, which is a government-owned television channel, broadcasting news, entertainment, music and sports content, will extend its audience reach over SatLink’s Global Satellite and Fibre Network across Africa, North America, Europe and the Middle East.

Using state-of-the-art technology, SatLink will broadcast ETV to the African market utilising SatLink’s capacity on AMOS-5 C-band, which will enable ETV to effectively distribute its content with ease to the continent’s multi-channel platforms.

ETV’s goal is to broadcast informative, educating and timely information of the development of Ethiopia. SatLink assisted the broadcaster to help design the uplink competencies for the channel from ETV’s Ethiopian-based facilities on to Amos.

This ensured the network of satellites chosen specially met the broadcaster’s needs and accomplished the international reach that was necessary.

The Ethiopian news channel will also be transmitted across Europe and the Middle East on Hot Bird 13.0° and for distribution into the North American market, ETV will utilise the Galaxy 19 at 97.0° West Ku-band. The latter hosts the biggest ethnic video platform in North America and ETV will use this to its advantage to reach the Direct to Home (DTH) ethnic market in the USA.

International news broadcasters such as France 24, i24 News, NTV-MIR, euronews and primary news agencies like Thomson Reuters and APTN already uses SatLink for the global distribution of content.

According to Worku Gachena, Deputy Director General for Media Technology at ETV, the company was looking for a global provider to not only distribute its content but to work alongside ETV as a partner to the organisation extend their global reach further than before.

Gachena said: “We needed a provider who had the experience to help design our uplink capabilities and also obtain satellite space on Amos-5 so we could meet the multi-channel platforms in Africa, a rapidly growing a prosperous broadcasting region.

“SatLink’s strategic location coupled with its extensive knowledge and experience in this market meant that we knew that they would be able to assist us as we extend our reach further and address our growing audience’s needs across the globe,” he concluded.

CEO of SatLink, David Hochner, commented: “We are thrilled to work with ETV to extend its audience reach to different corners of the globe using our Global Satellite and Fibre Network. By working closely alongside ETV we gained a real understanding of their broadcasting requirements and were able to tailor a reliable and effective solution, help them uplink their signal directly from Ethiopia and be on the world’s most popular satellite TV platforms.”

Hochner concluded that SatLink has been able to proactively assist ETV meet the objective of reaching its audiences, much of whom is scattered across multiple continents, so that viewers are able to connect with the news that is happening back home in Ethiopia and share the success stories of the country.

source: screenafrica



03/05/2014 09:53 AM
Meklit Takes Things ‘Slow’ On New Song (Premiere)
meklit-hadero-slow

Singer and songwriter Meklit Hadero covers a lot of ground, geographically and musically. Born in Ethiopia, Meklit (who goes by her first name) now lives in San Francisco, where she makes music that lands somewhere in the intersection of jazz, sultry pop, the traditional music of her homeland and Police covers. All of them are in evidence on “We Are Alive,” her second full-length album. Speakeasy today premieres “Slow,” one of 11 original tunes on the album.

It’s a captivating song that frames Meklit’s silky voice with rich, low horns and an easy-rolling bassline that ties the whole thing together. The song, like the album, reflects the singer’s belief that life is worth embracing, bumps and all.

“Nothing important takes the time you think it will,” Meklit told Speakeasy. “We all know this, yet we’re somehow always surprised. But why not just enjoy it, turn the process into a game and laugh at our very human tendency to rush through the very things we should be savoring. Slow, slow, slow.”

Along with the original tunes, “We Are Alive” features a version of the traditional Ethiopian song “Kemekem” and Meklit’s take on “Bring on the Night” by the Police. Eli Crews (Tune-Yards, Deerhoof) produced the album, which is due March 18 on Six Degrees Records (and is available here for pre-order). What do you think of “Slow?” Leave your thoughts in the comments.

source: wsj.com



03/03/2014 11:48 AM
Sileshi DemessIe presents evoking music
Sileshi DemessIe - yamral hagere

Last week Thursday, music lovers gathered at the Friendship International Hotel to listen to Sileshi Demessie aka Gash Abera Molla sing about the old days and ways of Addis Ababa and the rest of the country.

The artist performed songs from his new and highly appreciated album entitled ‘Yamral Hagere’. His songs especially from the new album have been well received as the music brought back memories of older traditional songs.

His lyrics touch up on simple and fun subjects such as old traditions of weddings and the old scenery of Addis Ababa. His song about the Abay River (Blue Nile) has touched and continues to touch many people’s hearts, especially now as the subject of the River has been in the spotlight.

Sileshi can manipulate the Kirar, traditional musical instrument that has some similarities with a guitar, he has had so many years of experience playing the instrument that it has become second nature to him.

The full house concert was not only a delight for the ears but also for the eyes. The music played was accompanied by colorful dancers as well as other performers that acted out the music’s lyrics dramatically.

The concert concluded with a dramatic performance to the song ‘Yameral Hagere’ where dancers that included the old and young alike, in the different Ethiopian cultural clothes gave a show that was well choreographed. The song and the performance attempted to show the harmony of the different nations and nationalities in the country as well as depict religious co-existence. There was also a performance of ‘Shelela’ which is an old Ethiopian war song that brought people to their feet.

The concert that was organized by Diageo, which is also the main sponsor of the album was truly an event not to be missed.

source: capitalethiopia



02/26/2014 09:24 AM
Revolutionizing the Ethiopian clothing industry

Fikirte Addis-ethiopian designer

The traditional weavers of Ethiopia are famous for their dexterity and skill, with all the knowledge passed down from generation to generation. Gradually designers and entrepreneurs are realizing the vast potential of this largely untapped resource.

Henok Reta met up with one such ambitious businessperson, and discovered more about the Ethiopian textile industry.

Working twenty-hour days and juggling fabrics in a series of swift skilled moves characterizes Ethiopian traditional weaving. As an ancient form of making clothes from cotton Ethiopians perform the process beautifully, despite its slower production capacity than the Asian model of textile industries. Although in many ways a tiresome business, traditional weaving has become the focus for many entrepreneurs, especially women, who are revolutionizing the fashion of traditional clothing.

Fikirte Addis is one such woman, and she has worked hard to become one of the country’s most reputable designers. After graduating from Addis Ababa University in social psychology she turned her back on her education and became a designer. Her intuitive knowledge and interest in designing clothes for family and friends influenced her decision. “I became motivated to do it when I felt the pleasure of the people who wore my ideas,” she said.

Her impressive attitude towards traditional clothing helped her to come up with a broad vision of mapping the route from her small design room to the weavers, yet it required a great deal of hard work and teamwork. She traveled to one of the country’s most important villages for weavers, known as Chencha, a small settlement in the south near the tourist-friendly Arba Minch. “The idea I conceived seemed crazy for people around me,” she remembers.

Going to Chencha exposed her to the industriousness of the traditional weavers, who are able to make 500 meters of fabric in 23 hours. The skills have been passed down through generations, and their abilities and speed encouraged her to maintain regular contact. Her first visit to the region also compelled her to change her business idea, and she decided to develop a model that preserved the wisdom of the people in the village.

She has three main missions, all under the trademark Yefikir Design. Business (selling), research and development, social and environment are the basic pillars that she hopes will boost her business in a responsible and far-sighted manner. “I always think that I have a responsibility and moral sense in what I am doing,” she says. Partnering with governmental and non-governmental organizations in the area of child labor, she has contributed positively to the wellbeing of the children weavers.

Fikirte points out that the main reasons for child labor in the weaving industry revolve around poverty, as families do not have enough money to provide food or education. As a result, many thousands of children flee villages in Chencha, Gamo Gofa, and Arbaminch to seek employment in larger towns and the capital Addis Ababa. They are subject to abuse from their employers, weaving day and night for small sums of money.

Fikirte’s plan is to capitalize the families’ economic power to sustain living in the locality. “Some of them are given sheds to work in, and they are better paid for the time they work efficiently,” she explains. As an entrepreneur she employs people with different skills, and her only request is that they produce items fitting her designs. In four years she has become well known in the town, continually accessing the opportunities to sell and promote her business.

After winning an award at the Champion Product Approach Design Show Africa in 2011 she was able to attend African business development seminars in Japan last year. “Everything has contributed to my work. I have been lucky enough to experience the way other people are doing things,” she says. Her desire to find women with excellent hand-weaving skills led her to Kuyu, a small town 57 kms north of the capital, where she coached them in making traditional eco bags.

Her recently developed online shopping experience is considered to be a result of her continual travels to the developed world, and adoption of the longstanding culture of work and business. “The money they make is good despite the place they work in which is small and narrower. What matters is the time and concentration they pledge to their duty,” she explains.

The long-term plan is to boost her business and create a conducive environment for the skilled labor she has in Addis Ababa, and her partners in Chencha. She is also keen on exploring the potential market for traditional outfits, and in modernizing the designs to make them more fashionable. Moreover, furthering her experience and boosting the concept of women entrepreneurship will be her focus. “Women, including me, have not achieved success without a struggle to fulfill our dreams. And we deserve to be celebrated because things have changed a little bit now, all due to the hard work and dedication to make these things happen,” she concludes.

source: thereporterethiopia



02/25/2014 01:42 AM
Entoto Beth Artisan: Beautiful jewelry made in Ethiopia aims to empower women
Entoto Beth Artisan: Beautiful jewelry made in Ethiopia aims to empower women

Entoto Beth Artisans aims to promote the empowerment of women and the greater HIV-affected region through the established entrepreneurial program.

Farmers till the fields in Ethiopia, harvesting artillery shells and re-purposing the casings left from the African nation’s civil war. Such is the inspiration for Entoto Beth Artisans, a fair-trade business helping transform destruction into beauty. Named for the Entoto Mountains set in central Ethiopia, a holy site that has attracted a community of HIV positive individuals in search of healing, Entoto Beth Artisans aims to promote the empowerment of women and the greater HIV-affected region through the established entrepreneurial program.

Beautiful jewelry made in Ethiopia aims to empower women and restore the HIV-affected region

Beautiful jewelry made in Ethiopia aims to empower women and restore the HIV-affected region

Each piece is made from repurposed local materials, including old tire treads, artillery shells and coffee beans. Hammered silver, plated nickel, copper and brass beads form elegant silhouettes. Abstract charms depict birds, leaves and traditional Ethiopian motifs add interest to pieces that range from demure strands to elaborate multi-tiered collars.

The use of bullets to eliminate poverty in a community battling HIV is the work of Entoto Beth Artisan founder, Bethlehem Berhane, who “had a big vision to work with women” and a personal conviction “to be the solution.” Bethlehem’s goal is not to employ women, or artisans, but inspire each towards entrepreneurship. To that end, each piece is named for the artisan who produced or designed it. “This is not about profit,” Berhane says of the business—which currently pays a fair wage to nearly 150 artisans, in addition to funding local programs in healthcare and education. The beauty and positivity produced by Entoto Beth Artisan is not hers, says Berhane. “It is for the benefit of this nation and for the world. It is for this generation.”

Entoto Beth Artisan pieces are sold by Raven and Lily, part of a new crop of socially conscious retailers whose commitment to effect positive change never sacrifices design.

Images courtesy of Raven and Lily



02/18/2014 02:29 AM
Hope with Art & Music: Art show gives orphans hope
Hope with Art & Music: Art show gives orphans hope

The event was organized by the Artists for Charity organization, Netsa Art Village, and Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity.

Hope with Art & Music, a show exhibiting statues, paintings and music art created by orphaned children aged 12-17 began on February 9th.

The whole program was started in 2005 by Professor Danny, Head of the Pediatric Department and of the Center for Pediatric AIDS and Infectious Diseases at Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem. It was designed to build the self-esteem of the boys and girls who participated in the show.

This year’s round up included 50 children who either made collage pictures, painted water colors, sculpted statues out of wood or made objects out of recyclable materials. There were also children who sang or played instruments with the popular band Addis Taem for the opening of the show attended by the Israeli Ambassador to Ethiopia Belaynesh Zevadia.

“Children I want you to look at me and see what I have become,” said Zevadia. “I want you to think, if Belaynesh has managed to become an ambassador, I can become anything I want.”

Monica Manaker and Elad Neeman musicians from Israel led the children in the songs. Later, the ambassador looked at the children’s art projects.

The event was organized by the Artists for Charity organization, Netsa Art Village, and Mother Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity.

“If anyone is interested in purchasing the children’s pictures, we will open a bank account in their name and put their money there,” said Mihiret Kebede, the managing director of Netsa Art Village. “This is a great opportunity for them to be spotted by talent scouts because the pictures are very remarkable.”

The exhibit lasted until Saturday. The children had spent ten days prior to the event practicing for the show and painting the pictures with the artists from Netsa Art Village and Addis Taem Band.

AHOPE Ethiopia is a charity that specializes in the care of HIV-positive orphans and vulnerable children as well as their families. The organization works to improve their health and general living conditions. Though the Israeli embassy paid for the art supplies, Addis Taem, Netsa Art Village and Ale School of Fine Arts & Design participated in the event free of charge.

source: capitalethiopia



02/16/2014 01:46 AM
‘Dignified’ African Migrants Picture Claims Top Photo Prize
african migrants photo prize 2013

In this photo provided on Feb. 14, 2014 by World Press Photo, the World Press Photo of the Year 2013 by John Stanmeyer, USA, VII for National Geographic, shows African migrants on the shore of Djibouti city at night, raising their phones in an attempt to capture an inexpensive signal from neighboring Somalia in Djibouti City, Djibouti.

Amsterdam (Reuters) – A picture of African migrants standing on the shore of Djibouti City at night, their glimmering phones held aloft to catch a weak signal, won the World Press Photo prize on Friday for American photographer John Stanmeyer of the VII Photo Agency.

The silhouetted figures facing seawards are straining to pick up a cheaper mobile signal from neighboring Somalia, hoping to establish a tenuous link with relatives abroad.

“So many pictures of migrants show them as bedraggled and pathetic … but this photo is not so much romantic, as dignified,” said jury member Susan Linfield.

Djibouti is a common stop-off point for migrants heading from nearby countries like Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea in search of a better life in Europe and the Middle East.

“It opens up discussions about technology, globalization, migration, poverty, desperation, alienation, humanity,” said jury member Jillian Edelstein of the photo, which was commissioned by National Geographic magazine.

Reuters photographer Goran Tomasevic, from Serbia, won first prize in the spot news stories category for a dramatic narrative series from Syria depicting a rebel attack on a government checkpoint.

France’s Phillipe Lopez of Agence France-Presse won the spot news singles category with a photograph of typhoon survivors in Tolosa, the Philippines, carrying religious iconography in front of a field of rubble.

Getty’s Brent Stirton, a South African, topped the category for single staged portraits with a picture of five blind albino boys from West Bengal, India. Dressed in matching pink shirts and blue trousers, they appear to gaze stiffly at the camera.



02/15/2014 01:45 AM
Horror of Ethiopian bride abduction shown at Berlin festival
difret- Zeresenay-Berhane-Mehari-Difret-berlin-2014

(L-R) Meaza Ashenafi, director Zeresenay Berhane Mehari and actress Meron Getnet attend the ‘Difret’ photocall during 64th Berlinale International Film Festival at Grand Hyatt Hotel on February 13, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. Source: Andreas Rentz/Getty Images Europe)

(Reuters) – “Angelina Jolie presents” is the first thing on screen in the Ethiopian movie “Difret”, but the true story of a 14-year-old girl’s abduction, rape and trial for killing her abductor speaks for itself.

Shown at the Berlin film festival, it features Hirut, a bright, studious girl who dreams of going to university but whose life becomes a nightmare when she is abducted, as is the custom in rural Ethiopia, by a young man to be his bride.

He beats, rapes and imprisons her in a hut, but she manages to grab his rifle, runs away and while being pursued, shoots him dead.

The twist that will jar Western audiences in this Sundance festival audience award winner based on events that took place in 1996 is that she is charged with murder. From the minute of her arrest the men of her village demand she be killed.

Jolie, who adopted one of her children from Ethiopia, asked to be an executive producer to raise the profile of a film.

“This is the first time for me to see the movie and for me it’s a flashback to 16 years,” Meaza Ashenafi, the head of a women’s law network in Ethiopia that successfully defended Hirut, said after a festival screening on Thursday night.

“It’s beautiful, let me put it this way, it’s simply beautiful,” Ashenafi said in a post-screening talk.

Ethiopian-born and U.S.-trained director Zeresenay Berhane Mehari said while he hoped the nascent film industry will grow in Ethiopia, he felt it was even more important to shine a light on the problem the movie depicts.

“It challenged me as an Ethiopian man, you know. I thought, would I be part of the problem?,” Mehari told Reuters in an interview.

“This is tradition, I know about it, I am part of that society. So, it was a question to myself first, could this be something I am also contributing to?

“And I wanted to say something about it and in the process I found out this actually is such a great story also as a filmmaker to tackle. So it was a win-win on both ends.”

He said the involvement of Jolie, who has directed a film about the impact of war on relations between ethnic Serbs and Bosnians during the Bosnian war, had given the project a huge lift.

“She gave me a call and said she wanted to be part of this and she wanted to be able to make it visible to a larger audience. And as you know, independent films especially from Africa don’t see a lot of light, (no matter) how great of a subject matter, how great of a production it is,” Mehari told Reuters.

“I think in the West we have our own preconceived ideas about films or people or traditions in Africa that we don’t care that much about. And this opened doors for us, you know, like for somebody like you to be curious about this story and why Angelina would be part of it.”

Ashenafi, whose Ethiopian Women Lawyers Association represented Hirut, said that despite the case having helped to change Ethiopian law, Hirut was still under threat from the relatives of the young man she killed.

“In an interesting development I was able to establish contact with her just one day before I arrived here. I spoke to her, she is still getting death threats from the family of her abductor,” Ashenafi told Reuters.

“She lives in an uncertain situation and that is a bit distressing for me, because after 16 years she is not free. But on the other hand it is not only distressing, but it is also triggering, you know. We just have to scale up our efforts.

“As soon as I go back I have to look into ways of handling again this problem. So it is not the end of the story at all. It is not the end of the story.”



02/12/2014 09:01 AM
Interview With ‘Difret’ Director and Producer
Zeresenay Mehari & Mihret Mandefro

Zeresenay Mehari & Mihret Mandefro at Sundance Award ceremony on Jan. 25th, 2014. (Getty Images)

New York (TADIAS) — Last month Difret, an Ethiopian film directed by Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, won the World Cinema Dramatic Audience Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. The film is currently premiering at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Difret, which was initially funded through Kickstarter — an online crowdfunding platform — chronicles the true story of a teenager, from a rural village in the Arsi region, whose widely publicized arrest for murder in the 90s unleashed a historic court battle that resulted in the girl’s acquittal on the grounds of self-defense and legally ended the traditional practice of child marriage by abduction in Ethiopia.

Click here for the interview with the film’s Director, Zeresenay Mehari and Producer Mehret Mandefro.



01/31/2014 10:02 AM
Ethiopian style
Funky footwear from Ethiopia-based brand Sawa

Addis Ababa’s designers and craftsmen are making an impression on the global fashion world

Addis Ababa may not spring to mind as a hotbed of fashion creativity. Yet savvy young fashion designers are bringing the country’s artisans to the fore, using traditional Ethiopian skills in new ways.

Ethiopian-born model Liya Kebede uses local craftsmen to create stunning pieces for her label LemLem (sold through Net-A-Porter), while shoe and clothes designer Enzi uses organic cottons and local textile artisans to create a range of casual clothes. The label’s shoes — crafted from Ethiopian cow, sheep or goat leather — and basic tees are sold in stores across the world, including the cutting-edge Konzepp in Hong Kong.

The vibrant scene is attracting outsiders too. Sawa shoes — makers of the cult high-top beloved by hipsters and sold in high-end stores including London’s Selfridges and Liberty — relocated to Ethiopia from Cameroon recently.

source: ba.com



01/27/2014 11:14 AM
“Difret” Wins World Cinema Dramatic Audience Award at Sundance Festival
Zeresenay Berhane Mehari & Mihret Mandefro at Sundance Film Festival 2014

Director Zeresenay Berhane Mehari & Producer Mihret Mandefro accept Audience Award for Difret on Saturday, Jan 25th at Sundance Film Festival (Photo Courtesy: Sundance Film Festival Awards Ceremony)

Difret, an Ethiopian film directed by Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, won the World Cinema Dramatic Audience Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival Saturday evening.

The ninety-nine minute drama is based on the true story of Aberash Bekele (Hirut), a 14-year-old from a small, rural village — not far from Addis Ababa — whose widely publicized arrest for murder in the late 1990s ensued an epic court battle that resulted in her acquittal on the grounds of self-defense. The case and ordeal of Hirut (played by teen actress Tizita Hagere) legally ended the long-upheld cultural tradition of marriage by abduction in Ethiopia. Difret is the first Ethiopian film to be featured at the Sundance Film Festival.

The film’s producers include Mehret Mandefro, Leelai Demoz, Zeresenay Berhane Mehari as well as Executive Producers Angelina Jolie, Julie Mehretu, Jessica Rankin, Francesca Zampi and Lacey Schwartz.

Other credits include Cinematographer: Monika Lenczewska; Editor: Agnieszka Glinska; Production Designer: Dawit Shawel; Composers: David Schommer and David Eggar.

source: tadias



01/23/2014 08:31 AM
The Nile Project launches African tour
nile-poject-african-tour

The Nile Gathering 2013 in Aswan (Photo: Courtesy of The Nile Project)

After a successful gathering of musicians in Upper Egypt’s Aswan early 2013, the Nile Project launches its second edition of the ‘Nile Gathering,’ to take place in Kampala, Uganda, from 23 January to 13 February.

The second edition of the musical residency — lead by Miles Jay — brings together 14 talented musicians from Burundi, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan and Uganda who will, in a collaborative manner, compose a body of songs inspired by the Nile Basin’s diversity in music traditions and instruments.

The musicians participating in the gathering include: Alsarah (Sudan / Vocals, Lyricist), Dafaalla El-Hag (Sudan / Oud, Percussion, Banimbo, Zombara), Dawit Seyoum (Ethiopia / Bass Krar, Krar), Dina El-Wedidi (Egypt / Vocals, Lyricist), Endris Hassen (Ethiopia / Masenko), Jorga Mesfin (Ethiopia / Saxophone), Kasiva Mutua (Kenya / Percussionist, Lyricist), Lawrence Okello (Uganda / Percussion, Adungu, Amadinda), Meklit Hadero (US and Ethiopia / Vocals), Michael Bazibu (Uganda / Endongo, Adungu, Endingidi, Percussion), Nader El-Shaer (Egypt / Kawala, Ney), Selamnesh Zemene (Ethiopia / Vocals), Sophie Nzayisenga (Rwanda / Inanga, Vocals), Steven Sogo (Burundi / Ikembe, Guitar, Bass, Vocals).

The first album resulting from 2013′s gathering was dubbed “Aswan”. Following the residency, the musicians performed two heavily packed live concerts in both Aswan and Cairo. The album was very well received internationally.

“We were very happy that the Nile Project’s music struck a deep chord with our Egyptian audiences last January,” said Mina Girgis, Nile Project executive director, in the project’s press release. “This year, we are hoping to build on that success by inviting a more diverse pool of musicians, expanding our performance circuit to more Nile Basin countries, and launching the project’s education and innovation programmes at partner universities.”

“We’re looking into how the Nile has connected us, even though we never knew we were connected,” Girgis told Ahram Online in late 2012, before the launch of the project. “The people along the Nile, most of them have never met and never knew each other.”

The Nile Project not only utilises music as a common language, to bridge gaps across diverse cultures that exist around the Nile, but also hosts ‘Nile Workshops’ at universities, starting with Egyptian universities in late 2013.

The African tour set to take place following this year’s residency will include not only concerts promoting the new musical collaboration but also talks and workshops on sustainability and development challenges of the Nile at universities in Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia and Egypt.

In addition to the workshops, the crew are also launching ‘The Nile Prize’ targeted at students who develop innovative solutions to regional challenges. These projects will be supported by the programme over the span of one year.

Through music and workshops, the Nile Project sets out to expose audiences to the music of neighbouring countries and offer a space of open dialogue around Nile issues. The project aims to connect the 11 nations, and 437 million people, who live around the Nile but that often fail at recognising themselves as a region.

Due to polarisation in these countries caused by tense political relations and conflicting media coverage, especially recently with the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam capturing headlines around the world, the Nile Project attempts to offer an alternative path for dialogue and communication among Nile Basin citizens.

The Nile Project is also planning tours to Europe in the summer of 2014 and North American in the winter of 2015.

The idea for the project developed following the Egyptian revolution, when Girgis came to Egypt after living in San Fransisco to be part of the movement in Tahrir Square.

Searching for his place and how to contribute to Egypt, Girgis along with his Ethiopian friend from the US, Melkit Hadero, started thinking of why there is little connection between Egyptian and Ethiopian musicians, and others around the region.

An ethnomusicologist by education, the idea of the Nile Project started coming together, and Girgis and Hadero spent most of 2012 traveling across the Nile Basin meeting musicians, development organisations and cultural institutions, to involve them in the early phases of planning the long-term project.

African Tour programme:
6 February, Jinja, Uganda – Mezzanine
8 February, Kampala, Uganda – National Theatre
15 February, Zanzibar, Tanzania – Sauti Za Busara Festival
22 February, Nairobi, Kenya – Kuona Art Centre
23 February, Nairobi, Kenya – Safaricom Jazz Festival
25 February, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – Africa Philanthropy Forum (private)
27 February, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – Location TBA
5 March, Cairo, Egypt – Al-Azhar Park
7 March, Aswan, Egypt – Nubian Museum
10 March, Alexandria, Egypt – Bibliotheca Alexandrina

source: ahram



01/21/2014 12:28 AM
Ethiopian filmmaker hopes ‘Difret’ will make a difference
Sundance Difret Director Zeresenay Berhane Mehari and actress Meron Getnet

Director Zeresenay Berhane Mehari and actress Meron Getnet, with the film “Difret,” in the L.A. Times photo & video studio at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

PARK CITY, Utah — When Zeresenay Berhane Mehari, newly arrived in the United States to continue his education, wrote to his father in Ethiopia that he’d decided to study film, the reaction was not exactly positive.

“He wrote back a two-page letter outlining what a big mistake it was,” says Mehari, smiling at the memory. “He felt that was what other people did, not Ethiopians. There were no filmmakers in the country, he didn’t have anything to relate to. He wanted me to study to be a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer. He gave me an ultimatum.”

Fortunately, that was a demand that the 37-year-old Mehari, who tells people to call him Z, chose to ignore. A graduate of USC film school, he wrote and directed the compelling “Difret,” the first Ethiopian film to be accepted at Sundance, a drama about the Ethiopian tradition of abducting young girls into marriage that is strong enough to have gotten the support of Angelina Jolie as an executive producer.

Read more from latimes



01/20/2014 09:16 AM
Zeray leaves ERTA to run broadcast authority
Zeray leaves ERTA to run broadcast authority

Head of Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency, Zeray Asgedom, has been assigned to run the relatively younger institution Ethiopian Broadcasting Authority (EBA)

Head of Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency, Zeray Asgedom, has been assigned to run the relatively younger institution Ethiopian Broadcasting Authority (EBA) filling a position which remained vacant for the past three months after its former Director General, Destaw Tesfaw, left for the Prime Minister’s Office.

According to sources close to matter, the former manager of Walta Information Center and currently general manager of Endowment Fund for the Rehabilitation of Tigray (EFFORT), Birhane Kidanemariam, is assigned to replace Zeray to run the state-owned agency that oversees the national television and radio station.

However, until press time, The Reporter was unable to confirm if Birhane was in fact handed the letter of appointment.

Zeray, who took over from Tabor Gebremichael, has been running ERTA for the past five years where he was acclaimed to have brought considerable changes in terms of improving infrastructure, expansing transmission range as well as laying the ground work to transform the agency from analog to digital system.

Nevertheless, ERTA also faced one of the biggest staff turnover rates in recent times. On Thursday, Head of Government Communication Affairs Office, Redwan Hussien, who is also the current Board Chairman of ERTA told the Houses of Peoples’ Representatives said that in the past six months alone over 137 employees have left the agency.

Redwan further told Members of Parliament (MPs) that one of the reason for employee turnover is the low salary scale the Agency offers to its workers.



01/19/2014 05:37 AM
One to watch in 2014: Kelela Mizanekristos
One to watch in 2014: Kelela Mizanekristos

On AfriPOP she is one of the ten African artists ‘who rocked 2013 and should be watched in 2014’, alongside the Nigerian duo P-Square. Kelela Mizanekristos, a second-generation Ethiopian immigrant who is moving beyond imitation, serendipity, and her dream productions.

She is a Los Angeles-based singer affiliated with the Night Slugs-sister collective Fade to Mind. Born in Washington DC, Kelela was raised in the Maryland suburbs. In the autumn of 2010 she made the “do or die” move to Los Angeles, short on plans but high on hope.

“I’ve grown up feeling very American but being constantly bothered by people — there’s internalized racism and feeling weird about being second-generation.” It’s a feeling that was crystallized on her first day of middle school, where it seemed like “everybody got a memo that said you’re supposed to sit with your race.” It was a slap round the face after elementary school, where she ate lunch with “a mixed bunch of friends.” After a year of going around to various tables with her best friend, they decided to make their own table. “We would eat our lunch together by ourselves and people would come to visit, and then after we were done with our food, we would go and hop around. I’ve always had this commitment to not being into one thing.” She draws a parallel with her relationship to music. As a kid she played violin in an orchestra, at home she listened to Miriam Makeba and Natalie Cole. Later on, she hung with a metal crowd.

Being an only child she would spend weekends and holidays with her cousins. In the car on the drive over she would “belt out” the songs from her first cassette, Tracy Chapman’s 1988 selftitled debut. That tape’s modest cover, showing Chapman with her hair short and her eyes on the floor, made a big impression, too. “After getting images of every other black women thrown at you — pop stars like Whitney Houston and Janet Jackson — you get this. I looked at it forever while listening to the album, continuously trying to wrap my brain around this woman,” Mizanekristos says.

Some of the most beautiful music in the world is sung by Kelela. She slyly entered the music scene with her October release, Cut 4 Me, and is currently working on her next project. Her sound is eerie yet calming, and petrifyingly emotive. Hard electronic sounds are juxtaposed with her honey sweet voice. Perhaps, one could call it R&B–electro pop, but that description does not seem to be sufficient. Her story does not quite follow the typical narrative of the talented child who new since age five that music and entertainment are what she wanted to do. She told Billboard that she only considered a music career four to five years ago, and what propelled her into the ‘business’ was a performance by Amel Larrieux in concert. What a pity it would be if she had not seen Amel Larrieux that day, because before joining Fade to Mind (her record company) she used to work in telemarketing. “I didn’t go to a school for music, but I definitely attended the Conservatory of Kelela in my mom’s basement,” Kelela admits. Just a few years before her move to the West Coast she still considered herself a shower singer, someone who didn’t project properly or use her chest voice. “I spent a lot of time imitating voices,” she says, and studying the pop R&B styling of artists like Mariah Carey and Cheryl “Coko” Clemons of SWV.

“I would like to do Brandy but weirder… Something that would resonate with most people, but make them feel a little uncomfortable.”

On stage, Kelela had the poise and presence of more experienced artists, bounding from club-ready productions to syrupy R&B balladry with ease.

After the set, audience members were impressed, hesitantly invoking the spectre of Aaliyah to describe the performance.

Kelela will release the ‘Bank Head / Send Me Out’ single soon; the A-side is the vocal version of the previously-released Kingdom production, and it will also appear on Kingdom’s forthcoming EP.

A mixtape will follow in early May, featuring tracks by Girl Unit, Jam City, and Morri$, among others. When we spoke, Kelela was on her way back to Los Angeles. She sounded eager to get back to the studio — perhaps as eager as an audience awaiting a singer that can bring this generation of dance music to life.

The LA-based performer, who performs under her first name, has every right to act a little haughtily. Her debut, Cut 4 Me, is one of the year’s most thrilling releases – a mixtape combining her gorgeous R&B voice and chilly, metallic production.

Reaching this point, and this sound, has taken her a while. “There have been a few permutations of Kelela,” she admits. The first was in an indie band in her native Washington DC. Then she began performing jazz standards.

“I was just committed to exercising my voice in every way possible,” she says. “I’d broken up with a boyfriend who had a Napster account and that was what I got in the divorce. It was how I was able to digest an immense amount of music.”

“I’ve always wanted to interrupt the space — more than sounding like anything, my commitment has just been to fuck it up.” Kelela Mizanekristos is nursing a nasty chest cough in an east London coffee shop. Despite her discomfort, her speaking voice is every bit as expressive as the one that leaps out of her debut, Cut 4 Me.

While early features — 2012’s “EFX” on Teengirl Fantasy’s Tracer, and “Bank Head”, her collaboration with producer Kingdom (which is included on the tape)—showcased her acrobatic range, Cut 4 Me mines new emotional and musical depths. While writing, she would ask herself: “What would I be most afraid to talk about?” And at every turn, her heart- topping, direct lyrics are engaged in a deep push-pull dialogue with the genre-blurring music of Fade to Mind and Night Slugs producers, including Jam City, Bok Bok, and Nguzunguzu.

source: thereporterethiopia



01/17/2014 01:56 AM
Meron Getnet selected as one of ’10 Actors to Watch Out For’ at Sundance 2014

Meron-Getnet-difret

Meron Getnet is selected as one of ’10 Actors to Watch Out For’ at Sundance 2014 (photo: Difret.com)


Meron Getnet (“Difret”)

Why You May Know Her: Starring in the first Ethiopian film to ever premiere at Sundance, Meron Getnet is a renown actress, poet, and playwright in Ethiopia. She was one of four Ethiopians chosen to attend President Obama’s African Youth Leaders Forum in DC. She is a feature a popular TV drama and is already a star in her country. And she’s rising in America with her debut at Sundance in a film written and directed by Zeresenay Berhane Mehari and executively produced by Angelina Jolie.

What Sundance Could Mean for Her: A breakout performance in the US. “Difret” is the story of a 14-year-old girl caught up in a country’s staggering progression toward equal rights. When she acts in self-defense, an aspiring young lawyer (Getnet) risks her career to represent the child and save her life. Based on real events, the World Dramatic film promises a daring and moving story. And hopefully a new spotlight for Getnet.
What’s Next? Getnet is currently working on her Masters on development and the arts at Addis Abada University. There’s nothing official in the works for more feature film performance, but this might be the first of many (or at least a couple) more.

Read more at indiewire



12/26/2013 08:29 AM
Teddy Ready for Journey of Love
teddy afro-Teddy Ready for Journey of Love

The renowned singer Tewodros Kasahun, a.k.a. Teddy Afro, has signed a sponsorship agreement with Heineken for his musical experience “Journey of Love”, which will see him perform in different venues across Ethiopia.

The renowned singer Tewodros Kasahun, a.k.a. Teddy Afro, has signed a sponsorship agreement with Heineken for his musical experience “Journey of Love”, which will see him perform in different venues across Ethiopia.

The agreement was announced yesterday at the Addis Ababa Hilton. During the ceremony, Teddy said that the main reason behind the journey is to unite all of Ethiopia through music.

“Though we have different cultures and languages, we all live in one country,” Teddy said. “Therefore, to unite all of us we have come up with the concept of musical concerts entitled Journey of Love.”

Johan Doyer, managing director of Heineken Breweries Share Company, said that there are two driving factors behind this sponsorship. The first is the artist’s well established explanations about the love journey, and the second is his willingness to travel in Ethiopia beyond Addis Ababa.

The journey will start on January 11, 2014, and will last for a year. It covers various cities in Ethiopia, including Dire Dawa, Jimma, Adama, and Addis Ababa. The journey is planned to start in Dire Dawa, where it will continue on around the country.

Both parties declined to reveal the budget for the concerts, and Heineken’s managing director said that the information is confidential.

Source: thereporterethiopia



12/11/2013 01:11 PM
In Ethiopia, the Beat Goes on, in Music and Health
In Ethiopia, the Beat Goes on, in Music and Health

Global youth dance at the beat making session at the International Conference on Family Planning in Addis Ababa. Credit: Laura Hoemeke/IntraHealth

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Last month in a chilly outdoor amphitheater at the African Union headquarters here, Stephen Levitin, aka Apple Juice Kid, asked an audience of mostly young Africans and North and South Americans to suggest the best type of beat.

“Afro beat,” one young African called out.

“Slow and sexy Afro beat?” Levitin asked. “Or fast and danceable?”

The consensus was fast and danceable. Then a percussive sound was chosen, and several of the young people — each in his or her mother tongue — recorded brief health messages of personal relevance to them.

And when they combined it all, the result was an original song. The group jumped to its feet and danced away the chill. Not a PowerPoint slide was to be seen anywhere.

And with that, Levitin and Pierce Freelon concluded another Beat Making Lab. Beat making — or composing music out of traditional rhythms and modern electronic techniques — involves using software to transform driving beats into original compositions. Freelon and Levitin, who both teach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, created the Beat Making Lab to reach communities around the world. They travel with an electronic music studio that fits into a backpack and train burgeoning beat makers to collaborate and use the equipment to make music.

But I wasn’t at a music festival. I was at the third International Conference on Family Planning, at a session hosted by IntraHealth International. In a conference filled with speeches, PowerPoint presentations and inscrutable posters, beat making stood out for its liveliness, creativity and sheer fun. It offers a new approach for engaging young people to make informed decisions about their sexual and reproductive health.

Read more from huffingtonpost



12/05/2013 07:09 AM
‘Sincerely, Ethiopia’: New documentary unveils inspiring tales from Ethiopia
‘Sincerely, Ethiopia’: New documentary unveils inspiring tales from Ethiopia

Araya, a 28-year-old Ethiopian-American, set out to tackle the public’s negative perceptions of his homeland by shifting his film’s focus to display a more positive portrayal of Ethiopian life and culture.

To much of the world, Ethiopia, along with other large parts of Africa, is often depicted as a poverty-stricken, famine-saturated land crumbling from conflict.

To Ethiopian natives, the country is seen in a more honest and uplifting light that exposes the people’s strong sense of pride and the land’s transcendent beauty often reflected in its rich culture.

In fact, Ethiopia is Africa’s oldest independent country and the continent’s second-most-populous nation.

Its lush red soil is draped across its breathtaking landscapes and constructs the foundation of a country that is home to over 93 million people – many of whom do face the harsh realities aforementioned – yet carry on with a grounded sense of strength and courage.

Yet while the challenges Ethiopia has faced (and currently still tackles) are well documented, the admirable ability of its people to overcome hardships has often been overlooked – until now.

Budding filmmaker Nathan Araya has stepped in to fill that void with his latest documentary Sincerely, Ethiopia.

Araya, a 28-year-old Ethiopian-American, set out to tackle the public’s negative perceptions of his homeland by shifting his film’s focus to display a more positive portrayal of Ethiopian life and culture.

In doing so, Araya uncovered more of the country’s hidden gems, which he discovered were nestled in the inspiring narratives of eight Ethiopians who have dedicated their lives to addressing the country’s ongoing challenges.

“Growing up as an Ethiopian-American and being able to see what the media has portrayed about Ethiopia and their lack of knowledge, it has always been very negative,” Araya told theGrio. “The documentary was an opportunity for me to not to negate the negative images of Ethiopia but to provide another side to the story that the world has never seen.”

Read more from The Grio



12/05/2013 07:09 AM
‘Sincerely, Ethiopia’: New documentary unveils inspiring tales from Ethiopia
‘Sincerely, Ethiopia’: New documentary unveils inspiring tales from Ethiopia

Araya, a 28-year-old Ethiopian-American, set out to tackle the public’s negative perceptions of his homeland by shifting his film’s focus to display a more positive portrayal of Ethiopian life and culture.

To much of the world, Ethiopia, along with other large parts of Africa, is often depicted as a poverty-stricken, famine-saturated land crumbling from conflict.

To Ethiopian natives, the country is seen in a more honest and uplifting light that exposes the people’s strong sense of pride and the land’s transcendent beauty often reflected in its rich culture.

In fact, Ethiopia is Africa’s oldest independent country and the continent’s second-most-populous nation.

Its lush red soil is draped across its breathtaking landscapes and constructs the foundation of a country that is home to over 93 million people – many of whom do face the harsh realities aforementioned – yet carry on with a grounded sense of strength and courage.

Yet while the challenges Ethiopia has faced (and currently still tackles) are well documented, the admirable ability of its people to overcome hardships has often been overlooked – until now.

Budding filmmaker Nathan Araya has stepped in to fill that void with his latest documentary Sincerely, Ethiopia.

Araya, a 28-year-old Ethiopian-American, set out to tackle the public’s negative perceptions of his homeland by shifting his film’s focus to display a more positive portrayal of Ethiopian life and culture.

In doing so, Araya uncovered more of the country’s hidden gems, which he discovered were nestled in the inspiring narratives of eight Ethiopians who have dedicated their lives to addressing the country’s ongoing challenges.

“Growing up as an Ethiopian-American and being able to see what the media has portrayed about Ethiopia and their lack of knowledge, it has always been very negative,” Araya told theGrio. “The documentary was an opportunity for me to not to negate the negative images of Ethiopia but to provide another side to the story that the world has never seen.”

Read more from The Grio



12/04/2013 07:10 AM
የኢትዮጵያ ሲኒማ የዓመቱ ምርጦች

ethiopin-2013-best-artists

ከትናንት በስቲያ (ኅዳር 23 ቀን) አመሻሽ ላይ የብሔራዊ ቴአትር መግቢያ በር ሳር ተጐዝጉዞበት…

፣ በእጣን ጭስ ታውዶ፣ የሀገር ባህል ልብስ ለብሰው ወዲያ ወዲህ በሚሉ አስተናባሪዎች የታጀበበት ነበር፡፡ ታዳሚው ወደ አዳራሽ ከገባ በኋላ ከታቀደለት አንድ ሰዓት ዘግይቶ ስምንተኛው የኢትዮጵያ ኢንተርናሽናል ፊልም ፌስቲቫል መደምደሚያ ዝግጅት ተጀመረ፡፡

ላለፈው አንድ ሳምንት የአገር ውስጥና የውጪ ፊልሞችን በማሳየት እንዲሁም በተለያዩ ፊልም ነክ ውይይቶች ሲከበር የነበረው የፊልም ፌስቲቫል ማጠቃለያ ያደረገው ለውድድር ከቀረቡት ፊልሞች መካከል አሸናፊዎችን ማሳወቅ ነበር፡፡ ከዳኞቹ አንዱ የሆነው አንዱዓለም አባተ እንደገለጸው በአሥር ዘርፎች ከተወዳደሩት ፊልሞች መካከል አሸናፊዎቹን ለመለየት የተሰየሙት አምስት ዳኞች ናቸው፡፡

በዚህም መሠረት በዳኞች ምርጫ የዓመቱ ምርጥ ሕፃን ተዋናይ ሕፃን ኢዮብ በ‹‹ያልታሰበው›› ፊልም፣ የዓመቱ ምርጥ ወንድ ተዋናይ ግሩም ኤርምያስ በ‹‹400 ፍቅር›› ፊልም፣ የዓመቱ ምርጥ ሴት ተዋናይ ሰላማዊት በፍቃዱ በ‹‹ሕይወት በደረጃ›› ፊልም ሲሆኑ የዓመቱ ምርጥ ሴት ረዳት ተዋናይ ትዕግስት ግርማ በ‹‹ለመድረስ›› ፊልም፣ የዓመቱ ምርጥ ወንድ ረዳት ተዋናይ ቴዎድሮስ ክፍሌ በ‹‹አጣምራለች›› ፊልም ናቸው፡፡

በስልክ የአጭር ጽሑፍ መልዕክት፣ በሕዝብ ከተመረጡት የዓመቱ ምርጥ ፊልም የተባለው ‹‹ልክ ነኝ›› ሲሆን በምርጥ የፊልም ጽሑፍ ዘርፍ ላይ ኤልያስ ሙሉዓለም በ‹‹የማታ›› ፊልም፣ በምርጥ ሲኒማ አውቶግራፊ ዘርፍ ሙሉጌታ መርሻ በ‹‹ኒሻን›› ፊልም አሸናፊ ሲሆኑ የዓመቱ ምርጥ አዘጋጅ የሆነው ይድነቃቸው ሹመቴ በ‹‹ኒሻን›› ፊልም ከመሆኑ ባሻገር በጉጉት ይጠበቅ የነበረውም የዓመቱ ምርጥ ፊልም ‹‹ኒሻን›› ሆኗል፡፡

የ‹‹ኒሻን›› ፊልም ጸሐፊ፣ አዘጋጅ፣ አርታኢና ፕሮዲውሰር የሆነው ይድነቃቸው ሹመቴ ‹‹ሥርየት›› የተሰኘው ፊልም የመጀመሪያ ሥራው ነው፡፡ ይድነቃቸው ‹‹ጥሩ ሥራ ሠርተሃል ተብዬ መሸለሜ መልካም ስሜት ፈጥሮብኛል፤ ለወደፊትም ራሴን እያዳበርኩ ለመሄድ ማበረታቻ ይሆነኛል›› ሲል በሽልማቱ የተሰማውን ስሜት ገልጾ ‹‹እኛ ፊልም ሠሪዎች ፊልሞቻችን የአስተሳሰብ አድማስን ማስፋት እንዲችሉ በሚገባ የመሥራት ኃላፊነት አለብን›› ካለ በኋላ የኢትዮጵያ ፊልም ኢንዱስትሪ አሁን ካለበት ወደ ተሻለ ደረጃ እንዲያድግ ደረጃውን በጠበቀ የምስልና ድምጽ ቅንብር ዘመናዊ መሳሪያዎች በመታገዝ ሊሠራ እንደሚገባው ገልጿል፡፡

Source: ethiopianreporter



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